Education

The Comprehensive Public High School

This book traces the decline of the public comprehensive high school. New educational markets emphasized school diversity and parental choice rather than social equity through common schooling, and they were criticized for declining standards. The book also considers government education policies and their regional manifestations.

The Comprehensive Public High School

The American State Normal School

The American State Normal School is the first comprehensive history of the state normal schools in the United States. Although nearly two-hundred state colleges and regional universities throughout the U.S. began as ‘normal’ schools, the institutions themselves have buried their history, and scholars have largely overlooked them. As these institutions later became state colleges and/or regional universities, they distanced themselves from the low status of elementary-literally erasing physical evidence of their normal-school past. In doing so, they buried the rich history of generations of students for whom attending normal school was an enriching, and sometimes life-changing experience. Focusing on these students, the first wave of ‘non-traditional’ students in higher education, The American State Normal School is a much-needed re-examination of the state normal school.This book was subject of an annual History of Education Society panel for best new books in the field.

The American State Normal School

Take Back Higher Education

At the beginning of the new millennium, higher education is under siege from right-wing ideologies and neo-liberalism. In this title, the authors argue that, if higher education is to meet the challenges of a democratic future, it must first confront neo-liberalism, racism and the shredding of the social contract.

Take Back Higher Education

Science Literacy in Primary Schools and Pre-Schools

Science is more than a compilation of facts and figures, although one would not know that from observing classroom lessons in science in elementary schools in many parts of the world. In fact, there are those who argue that science is not appropriate subject content for the early grades of elementary school. There are many schools in which science is simply not present in the earliest grades. Even where science is taught in the earliest grades, it is often a caricature of science that is p- sented to the children. This book offers a vigorous, reasoned argument against the perspective that s- ence doesn’t belong in the early grades. It goes beyond that in offering a view of s- ence that is both appropriate to the early grades and faithful to the nature of the scientific enterprise. Dr. Eshach is not a voice in the chorus that claims young ch- dren’s developmental lack of readiness for such study. He believes, as do I, that in order to learn science one must do science. At the heart of the doing of science is the act of exploration and theory formation. To do science, we must explore the ways in which the world around us looks, sounds, smells, feels, and behaves.

Science Literacy in Primary Schools and Pre-Schools

Creating the European Area of Higher Education

COM(91) 349 final and the Peripheries of European Higher Education Voldemar Tomusk Open Society Institute Budapest For a man who no longer has a homeland, writing becomes a place to live. Theodor Adorno, Minima Moralia 1. REDEMPTIVE IRONY OF STRATEGIES AND PROCESSES It is unfortunate to a degree that as soon as we begin discussing our human condition in the third millennium since mankind was offered its salvation, and the state of our institutions that structure and guide our existence as social beings in order not to act as beasts or mere social animals, we cannot avoid the word ironic’. For the people of intellectual calling who cannot but try to make sense of what is happening around, in and with us beyond digestion in the broad sense of the term, that is beyond the consuming the resources of the earth, ironic is the word without which nothing can be said any longer. Deliver Us from Irony’ is the title of a recent paper by a young historian discussing the last great post-modern historian Hayden White in his approach of employing epistemological irony against moral irony (Paul 2004). The degree to which our existence has become ironic is truly tragic, though it could be worse. Human existence has become ironic so much that one can but weep. However, there are other ways to explain the situation.

Creating the European Area of Higher Education

Education for All and Multigrade Teaching

Multigrade teaching poses a challenge to learning. Millions of learners worldwide are taught by teachers who, at any one time, are responsible for two or more school grades/years. These are the invisible multigrade teachers who struggle to provide learning opportunities for all within curriculum and teacher education systems designed for monograded classes. In many countries multigraded classes arise out of necessity and are regarded as second class education. Yet in some parts of the world learning and teaching in multigraded settings is embraced as the pedagogy of choice, offering equivalent, and sometimes superior, learning opportunities. Multigrade teaching provides an opportunity for improved learning. This book is based on original research on challenges and opportunities in Colombia, England, Ghana, Malawi, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Peru, Turks and Caicos Islands and Vietnam. Its purpose is to raise awareness among educational policymakers and practitioners worldwide of the realities of multigrade classes in the context of Education for All, and to explore the implications for teachers, teacher educators, curriculum developers and educational planners.

Education for All and Multigrade Teaching

Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research

A compendium of thorough and integrative literature reviews on a diverse array of topics of interest to the higher education scholarly and policy communities. Each chapter provides a comprehensive review of research findings on a selected topic and critiques the research literature.

Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research

The Practical Critical Educator

I am delighted to have the opportunity to write this foreword for Karyn Cooper’s and Robert White’s splendid and compelling edited text on The Practical Critical Educator. Critical practice in education is grounded in two bodies of thought and action: critical theory and critical pedagogy. Drawing on classical Marxism and its articulation of how oppression and injustice arose through capitalism’s economic exploitation of labour, critical theories of society took a cultural turn in the writings of Adorno and Horkheimer, European Jewish refugees who fled to America, where they articulated how the power relations and oppressive forces of capitalism expressed themselves in the alienating symbolic forces of culture, music and art. When booming demographics and an economic surplus fuelled the student movement of the late 60s, and in to the 70s, in many Western nations, new forms of cultural Marxism were added to this body of critical theory, extending beside but also far beyond the classical Marxist preoccupations with economic equalities of social class. British writers, such as the articulate and elegant cultural Marxist Raymond Williams, revived and refined the lost work of Italian Marxist, Antonio Gramsci from the 1920s, and his concern with the influence of what he called hegemony the force through which ruling classes could maintain existing structures of domination by defining, through language, media and culture, what was normal, natural, true, beautiful and defensible, and what was eccentric, unreasonable, or unworthy of serious consideration.

The Practical Critical Educator

Theatre as a Medium for Children and Young People: Images and Observations

This book opens doorways to new understandings, even as it poses a challenge to educators, theatre people, and others concerned about the lives of today’s children. At once it raises a wealth of questions regarding the meanings of theatre, the role of imagination, the difference (especially for children) between the fictional and the real. Indeed, one of the attractions of Dr. Schonmann’s book is her evident cherishing of open questions, many of which involve her readers in explorations of their own experiences and in a renewed wonder at what the arts can bring to human lives. Her focus is on children’s theatre as a unique art form with its own symbol system and its particular demands on audiences. Dealing as she does with images and enactments as well as with a range of theories, she makes readers aware of unexplored possibilitiespedagogical and aestheticfor early childhood and elementary education. Her core argument is that children’s theatre is not a reduced version of adult theatre. Nor is it arbitrarily concocted in accord with adult notions of children as incomplete adults. It is well known that the idea of a child as a being in process of growing, of becoming, stems from the work of John Dewey and others at the turn of the last century. Dr. Schonmann’s conception of children’s theatre responds to such a view. Plays for children, whether in or out of school, whether performed by the young or by professionals, are not developed by formula.

Theatre as a Medium for Children and Young People: Images and Observations

Widening Access to Education as Social Justice

Among the greatest challenges of the twenty-first century is that of providing adequate educational opportunities to all citizens of the globe. The broad availability of such opportunities and the genuine ability to take advantage of them are fundamental components of any equitable society. In examining how widening access to education contributes to social justice, this anthology composes a tribute to the life and work of the Nigerian educationist Michael A. Omolewa. The twenty-seven contributions to this volume discuss foundational issues related to the educational dimensions of social justice, present overviews of approaches related to widening access, and analyze case studies from around the world, as well as consider future directions in education policy and research. This thematic depth is matched by the geographic representativeness of the work, with contributors coming from the global South and North. Widening Access to Education as Social Justice speaks with a credible and powerful voice about how making greater formal and informal educational opportunities available to men and women, young adults and children everywhere can help bring about more equitable ways of living together, thereby fostering the goods of cultural diversity, tolerance and respect along with the creativity and responsibility vital to bringing about actual social harmony.

Widening Access to Education as Social Justice

1 2 3 4 5 26