Science

Reflections on the Problem of Consciousness

The relation between body and mind has presented philosophy with its perennial problem. It exercised the minds of Plato and Aristotle and it was implicit in the thought, if not always present to the minds, of the Presocratics. In modern philosophy it became explicit in Descartes’s Meditations and remained central to the deliberations of every subsequent philosopher of any significance from Hobbes to Hume, from Spinoza to Hegel, and from Husserl and Heidegger to Russell and Whitehead. From whatever angle one approaches philosophy one cannot avoid this problem. Moral philosophy, both ethical and political, compels one to adopt some conception of human nature, its origins and status within the world, for one cannot decide on the best way to live without considering the impact of natural influences on the human condition and of human behaviour on nature including other humans; and these considerations at once raise the question of the relation of the human mind to Nature and the natural body it enlightens. A philosophy of Nature must include the place of humanity in the natural scheme, not only the human body, but also the knowing mind. Metaphysics cannot be divorced from Epistemology nor can that neglect the part played in the acquisition of knowledge by the bodily senses. And clearly a philosophy of mind must include some vision of the relation of the mind to the body it inhabits.

Reflections on the Problem of Consciousness

Bioelectromagnetics Current Concepts

Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on The Mechanisms of the Biological Effect on Extra High Power Pulses (EHPP), Yerevan, Armenia 3 – 5 March 2005

Bioelectromagnetics Current Concepts

Past and Present Water Column Anoxia

Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop, held in Yalta, Crimea, Ukraine, 4-8 October 2003

Past and Present Water Column Anoxia

Photosystem II

The most mysterious part of photosynthesis yet the most important for all aerobic life on Earth (including ourselves) is how green plants, algae and cyanobacteria make atmospheric oxygen from water. This thermodynamically difficult process is only achieved in Nature by the unique pigment/protein complex known as Photosystem II, using sunlight to power the reaction. The present volume contains 34 comprehensive chapters authored by 75 scientific experts from around the world. It gives an up-to-date account on all what is currently known about the molecular biology, biochemistry, biophysics and physiology of Photosystem II. The book is divided into several parts detailing the protein constituents, functional sites, tertiary structure, molecular dynamics, and mechanisms of homeostasis. The book ends with a comparison of Photosystem II with other related enzymes and bio-mimetic systems. Since the unique water-splitting chemistry catalyzed by Photosystem II leads to the production of pure oxygen gas and has the potential for making hydrogen gas, a primary goal of this book is to provide a molecular guide to future protein engineers and bio-mimetic chemists in the development of biocatalysts for the generation of clean, renewable energy from sunlight and water.

Photosystem II

An Introduction to Differential Geometry with Applications to Elasticity

curvilinear coordinates. This treatment includes in particular a direct proof of the three-dimensional Korn inequality in curvilinear coordinates. The fourth and last chapter, which heavily relies on Chapter 2, begins by a detailed description of the nonlinear and linear equations proposed by W.T. Koiter for modeling thin elastic shells. These equations are two-dimensional, in the sense that they are expressed in terms of two curvilinear coordinates used for de?ning the middle surface of the shell. The existence, uniqueness, and regularity of solutions to the linear Koiter equations is then established, thanks this time to a fundamental Korn inequality on a surface and to an in?nit- imal rigid displacement lemma on a surface. This chapter also includes a brief introduction to other two-dimensional shell equations. Interestingly, notions that pertain to di?erential geometry per se,suchas covariant derivatives of tensor ?elds, are also introduced in Chapters 3 and 4, where they appear most naturally in the derivation of the basic boundary value problems of three-dimensional elasticity and shell theory. Occasionally, portions of the material covered here are adapted from – cerpts from my book Mathematical Elasticity, Volume III: Theory of Shells, published in 2000by North-Holland, Amsterdam; in this respect, I am indebted to Arjen Sevenster for his kind permission to rely on such excerpts. Oth- wise, the bulk of this work was substantially supported by two grants from the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China [Project No. 9040869, CityU 100803 and Project No. 9040966, CityU 100604].

An Introduction to Differential Geometry with Applications to Elasticity

The Adria Microplate: GPS Geodesy, Tectonics and Hazards

To be included in the prelims:Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on The Adria Microplate: GPS Geodesy, Active Tectonics and Hazards, held in Veszprem, Hungary 4-7 April 2004.

The Adria Microplate: GPS Geodesy, Tectonics and Hazards

Rationality and Reality

Alan Musgrave has consistently defended two positions that he regards as commonsensical critical realism and critical rationalism. In defence of critcal realism he argues for the objective existence of the external world as opposed to idealism, as well as arguing for scientific realism against all anti-realist accounts of science. His critical rationalism is drawn from the work of Karl Popper and stands opposed to inductivist and irrationalist methodologies. In defence of these positions, Musgrave’s writings have covered a wide range of topics in epistemology, metaphysics, philosophy of science, philosophy of mathematics, history of science, theories of truth, and economic theory. In this volume a group of internationally-renowned authors discuss themes that are relevant in one way or another to Musgrave’s work. This is not intended as a standard celebratory festschrift but rather as a new examination of topics of current interest in philosophy. The contributory essays are followed by responses from Alan Musgrave himself.

Rationality and Reality

Drug Metabolism

Drug Metabolism: Current Concepts provides a comprehensive understanding of the processes that take place following ingestion of a medicinal agent or xenobiotic, with an emphasis on the crucial role of metabolism (biotransformation). How a sound knowledge of these phenomena is incorporated into the design of effective new drug candidates is also explained. The user-friendly text focuses on concepts rather than extraneous details and is supported by many illustrated examples of biotransformations as well as frequent references to current critical reviews and articles highlighting the nature of research objectives in this vibrant area of medicinal development. The final topic on strategies for drug design relies on the background provided by the rest of the book. This book is ideally suited as an advanced text for courses in drug metabolism for students of medicine, pharmacy, pharmacology, biochemistry; and for courses in drug design and drug delivery for students of medicinal chemistry. It is also appropriate for professional seminars or courses that relate to the fate of a drug in the body, drug interactions, adverse reactions and drug design.

Drug Metabolism

The Structure and Function of Plastids

The Structure and Function of Plastids provides a comprehensive look at the biology of plastids, the multifunctional biosynthetic factories that are unique to plants and algae. Fifty-nine international experts have contributed 28 chapters that cover all aspects of this large and diverse family of plant and algal organelles.

The Structure and Function of Plastids

The Self in Infancy

The origins of knowledge about the self is arguably the most fundamental problem of psychology. It is a classic theme that has preoccupied great psychologists, beginning with William James and Freud. On reading current literature, today’s developmental psychologists and ethologists are clearly expressing a renewed interest in the topic. Furthermore, recent progress in the study of infant and animal behavior, provides important and genuinely new insights regarding the origins of self-knowledge. This book is a collection of current theoretical views and research on the self in early infancy, prior to self-identification and the well-documented emergence of mirror self-recognition. The focus is on the early sense of self of the young infant. Its aim is to provide an account of recent research substantiating the precursors of self-recognition and self-identification. By concentrating on early infancy, the book provides an updated look at the origins of self-knowledge.

The Self in Infancy

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