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    In this collection, Civil War historian Gary W. Gallagher examines Robert E. Lee, his principal subordinates, the treatment they have received in the literature on Confederate military history, and the continuing influence of Lost Cause arguments in the late-twentieth-century United States. Historical images of Lee and his lieutenants were shaped to a remarkable degree by the reminiscences and other writings of ex-Confederates who formulated what became known as the Lost Cause interpretation of the conflict. Lost Cause advocates usually portrayed Lee as a perfect Christian warrior and Stonewall Jackson as his peerless "right arm" and often explained Lee's failings as the result of inept performances by other generals. Many historians throughout the twentieth century have approached Lee and other Confederate military figures within an analytical framework heavily influenced by the Lost Cause school. The twelve pieces in Lee and His Generals in War and Memory explore the effect of Lost Cause arguments on popular perceptions of Lee and his lieutenants. Part I offers four essays on Lee, followed in Part II by five essays that scrutinize several of Lee's most famous subordinates, including Stonewall Jackson, John Bankhead Magruder, James Longstreet, A.P. Hill, Richard S. Ewell, and Jubal Early. Taken together, these pieces not only consider how Lost Cause writings enhanced or diminished Confederate military reputations but also illuminate the various ways post--Civil War writers have interpreted the actions and impacts of these commanders. Part III contains two articles that shift the focus to the writings of Jubal Early and LaSalle Corbell Pickett, both of whom succeeded in advancing the notion of gallant Lost Cause warriors. The final two essays, which contemplate the current debate over the Civil War's meaning for modern Americans, focus on Ken Burns's documentary The Civil War and on the issue of battlefield preservation. Gallagher adeptly highlights the chasm that often separates academic and popular perceptions of the Civil War and discusses some of the ways in which the Lost Cause continues to resonate. Lee and His Generals in War and Memory will certainly attract those interested in Lee and his campaigns, the Army of Northern Virginia, the establishment of popular images of the Confederate military, and the manner in which historical memory is created and perpetuated.
    In Atomic Testing in Mississippi, David Allen Burke illuminates the nearly forgotten history of America's only nuclear detonations east of the Mississippi River. The atomic tests, conducted in the mid-1960s nearly 3,000 feet below ground in Mississippi's Tatum Salt Dome, posed a potential risk for those living within 150 miles of the site, which included residents of Hattiesburg, Jackson, Gulfport, Biloxi, Mobile, and New Orleans. While the detonations provided the United States with verification methods that helped limit the world's nuclear arsenals, they sparked widespread public concern. In 1964 and 1966 the Atomic Energy Commission conducted experiments at the salt dome -- code-named Dribble -- surrounded by a greater population density than any other test site in the United States. Although the detonations were not weapons tests, they fostered a conflict between regional politicians interested in government-funded science projects and a population leery of nuclear testing near their homes. Even today, residents near the salt dome are still fearful of long-term negative health consequences. Despite its controversy, Project Dribble provided the technology needed to detect and assess the performance of distant underground atomic explosions and thus verify international weapons treaty compliance. This technology led to advanced seismological systems that now provide tsunami warnings and detect atomic activity in other nuclear nations, such as Pakistan and North Korea.
    The first textbook to emphasize the importance of critical thinking skills to practice, this third edition of the classic Social Work Practice retains its unique focus on thinking critically about decisions that social workers make daily.
    In Reconstruction in the Cane Fields, John C. Rodrigue examines emancipation and the difficult transition from slavery to free labor in one enclave of the South -- the cane sugar region of southern Louisiana. In contrast to the various forms of sharecropping and tenancy that replaced slavery in the cotton South, wage labor dominated the sugar industry. Rodrigue demonstrates that the special geographical and environmental requirements of sugar production in Louisiana shaped the new labor arrangements. Ultimately, he argues, the particular demands of Louisiana sugar production accorded freedmen formidable bargaining power in the contest with planters over free labor. Rodrigue addresses many issues pivotal to all post-emancipation societies: How would labor be reorganized following slavery's demise? Who would wield decision-making power on the plantation? How were former slaves to secure the fruits of their own labor? He finds that while freedmen's working and living conditions in the postbellum sugar industry resembled the prewar status quo, they did not reflect a continuation of the powerlessness of slavery. Instead, freedmen converted their skills and knowledge of sugar production, their awareness of how easily they could disrupt the sugar plantation routine, and their political empowerment during Radical Reconstruction into leverage that they used in disputes with planters over wages, hours, and labor conditions. Thus, sugar planters, far from being omnipotent overlords who dictated terms to workers, were forced to adjust to an emerging labor market as well as to black political power. The labor arrangements particular to postbellum sugar plantations not only propelled the freedmen's political mobilization during Radical Reconstruction, Rodrigue shows, but also helped to sustain black political power -- at least for a few years -- beyond Reconstruction's demise in 1877. By showing that freedmen, under the proper circumstances, were willing to consent to wage labor and to work routines that strongly resembled those of slavery, Reconstruction in the Cane Fields offers a profound interpretation of how former slaves defined freedom in slavery's immediate aftermath. It will prove essential reading for all students of southern, African American, agricultural, and labor history.
    The ten essays in this interdisciplinary collection explore the lives, places, and stories of women in the Iberian Atlantic between 1500 and 1800. Distinguished contributors such as Ida Altman, Matt D. Childs, and Allyson M. Poska utilize the complexities of gender to understand issues of race, class, family, health, and religious practices in the Atlantic basin. Unlike previous scholarship, which has focused primarily on upper-class and noble women, this book examines the lives of those on the periphery, including free and enslaved Africans, colonized indigenous mothers, and poor Spanish women. Chapters range broadly across time periods and regions of the Atlantic world. The authors explore the lives of Caribbean women in the earliest era of Spanish colonization and gender norms in Spain and its far-flung colonies. They extend the boundaries of the traditional Atlantic by analyzing healing knowledge of indigenous women in Portuguese Goa and kinship bonds among women in Spanish East Texas. Together, these innovative essays rechart the Iberian Atlantic while revealing the widespread impact of women's activities on the emergence of the Iberian Atlantic world.
    With so many afflicted by the slings and arrows of outrageous angst, its true origin has remained mysterious. A new theoretical synthesis suggests that while animals share a set of evolved social instincts, we humans experience commonplace Anxiety and Depressive disorders when we use our reason to defy that biology.
    This book provides a non-mathematical introduction to the theory and application of Exploratory Factor Analysis. Among the issues discussed are the use of confirmatory versus exploratory factor analysis, the use of principal components analysis versus common factor analysis, procedures for determining the appropriate number of factors, and methods for rotating factor solutions.
    Robert Wuthnow has been praised as one of "the country's best social scientists" by columnist David Brooks, who hails his writing as "tremendously valuable." The New York Times calls him "temperate, balanced, compassionate," adding, "one can't but admire Mr. Wuthnow's views." A leading authority on religion, he now addresses one of the most profound subjects: the end of the world. In Be Very Afraid , Wuthnow examines the human response to existential threats--once a matter for theology, but now looming before us in multiple forms.
    More than fifty years after its initial publication, C. Vann Woodward's landmark work, The Burden of Southern History, remains an essential text on the southern past. Today, a "southern burden" still exists, but its shape and impact on southerners and the world varies dramatically from the one envisioned by Woodward. Recasting Woodward's ideas on the contemporary South, the contributors to The Ongoing Burden of Southern History highlight the relevance of his scholarship for the twenty-first-century reader and student. This interdisciplinary retrospective tackles questions of equality, white southern identity, the political legacy of Reconstruction, the heritage of Populism, and the place of the South within the nation, along with many others. From Woodward's essays on populism and irony, historians find new insight into the burgeoning Tea Party, while they also shed light on the contemporary legacy of the redeemer Democrats. Using up-to-date election data, scholars locate a "shrinking" southern identity and point to the accomplishments of the recent influx of African American voters and political candidates. This penetrating analysis reinterprets Woodward's classic for a new generation of readers interested in the modern South. Contributors: Josephine A. V. Allen, Charles S. Bullock III, James C. Cobb, Donald R. Deskins Jr., Leigh Anne Duck, Angie Maxwell, Robert C. McMath, Wayne Parent, Sherman C. Puckett, Todd Shields, Hanes Walton Jr., Jeannie Whayne, Patrick G. Williams.
    In Demystifying Psychiatry , two eminent psychiatrists offer an illuminating look at the entire field, offering a clear and informative portrait of a medical specialty often clouded in myth. Zorumski and Rubin range from a basic discussion of what psychiatry is, to the types of illnesses psychiatrists treat, the training of psychiatrists, the treatment of psychiatric disorders (covering medications, psychotherapy, lifestyle interventions, electroconvulsive therapy, and much more), and how families can help with treatment, among other topics.
    In Patent and Trade Disparities in Developing Countries , Srividhya Ragavan examines the interaction between trade and intellectual property regimes (using the patent regime in India as the focal point) in an integrated developmental framework to determine how sustainable economic growth can be achieved in developing countries.
    In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, French cooks began to claim central roles in defining and enforcing taste, as well as in educating their diners to changing standards. Tracing the transformation of culinary trades in France during the Revolutionary era, Jennifer J. Davis argues that the work of cultivating sensibility in food was not simply an elite matter; it was essential to the livelihood of thousands of men and women. Combining rigorous archival research with social history and cultural studies, Davis analyzes the development of cooking aesthetics and practices by examining the propagation of taste, the training of cooks, and the policing of the culinary marketplace in the name of safety and good taste. French cooks formed their profession through a series of debates intimately connected to broader Enlightenment controversies over education, cuisine, law, science, and service. Though cooks assumed prominence within the culinary public sphere, the unique literary genre of gastronomy replaced the Old Regime guild police in the wake of the French Revolution as individual diners began to rethink cooks' authority. The question of who wielded culinary influence -- and thus shaped standards of taste -- continued to reverberate throughout society into the early nineteenth century. This remarkable study illustrates how culinary discourse affected French national identity within the country and around the globe, where elite cuisine bears the imprint of the country's techniques and labor organization.
    Handel's music forms one of the peaks of the Baroque style, and his career combined the benefits of patronage with a sturdy independence. This biography provides a comprehensive and balanced account of both the man and his music, drawing on the unusually rich legacy of contemporary documentary and musical sources. This newly revised edition of Handel incorporates material resulting from a recent resurgance in scholarly interest in and performances of Handel and his music.
    The Oxford Handbook of Traumatic Stress Disorders covers the current landscape of research and clinical knowledge surrounding traumatic stress disorders. Topics include classification and phenomenology, contributions from theory, assessment and treatment of traumatic stress disorders, prevention, and early intervention following trauma.
    This book considers the contribution of white matter to cognition and emotion. Every chapter has been rewritten and two new ones added. White matter dementia is updated, and the concept of mild cognitive dysfunction proposed. A unifying theme is connectivity within neural networks by which the human mind is organized.
    This biography of Elizabeth Barrett Browning, written with reference to Browning correspondence only recently available, argues that the poet was a strong and determined woman largely responsible for her own incarceration in Wimpole Street. The author traces her life from her early childhood and adolescence and explores her marriage. She draws a picture of early Victorian family life and aims to show that Elizabeth was a considerable and dedicated poet, self-willed, witty and courageous. Forster has also edited the companion volume "Selected Poems" of Elizabeth Barrett Browning, and is author of several other biographies.
    ANOTHER DAY IN THE MONKEY'S BRAIN charts a neuroscientist's journey to understand the central mysteries of consciousness. As a pioneer in the technique of mesoscopic imaging, Dr. Siegel worked with some of the giants in vision science: Torsten Wiesel, Francis Crick, Tom Albright and many others. With insight and clarity, he shows how science is built on such relationships. Along the way, he gives a vivid sense of the abundant passion and creativity that drive scientists in their pursuit of understanding. From monkey to man, Dr. Siegel finds the beauty in the scientific discovery of self in mind and brain.
    Winner of the Ned Kelly Award for Crime Fiction. Meet Jack Irish, criminal lawyer, debt collector, football lover, turf watcher, trainee cabinetmaker, and one of the best crime characters ever created. When Jack receives a puzzling message from a jailed ex-client he's too deep in misery over Fitzroy's latest loss to take much notice. Next thing Jack knows, the ex-client's dead and he's been drawn into a life-threatening investigation involving high-level corruption, dark sexual secrets, shonky property deals, and murder. With hitmen after him, shady ex-policemen at every turn, and the body count rising, Jack needs to find out what's going on - and fast. The first novel in the iconic Jack Irish series, Bad Debts was originally published in 1996 and won the Ned Kelly Award for Best First Novel. Guy Pearce stars as Jack Irish in the ABC telemovies based on the series. Peter Temple is the author of nine novels, including four books in the Jack Irish series. He has won the Ned Kelly Award for Crime Fiction five times, and his widely acclaimed novels have been published in over twenty countries. The Broken Shore won the UK's prestigious Duncan Lawrie Dagger for the best crime novel of 2007 and Truth won the 2010 Miles Franklin Literary Award, the first time a crime writer has won an award of this calibre anywhere in the world. 'One of the world's finest crime writers.' The Times 'Having read the new novels of Michael Connelly and Martin Cruz Smith, I have to say that Temple belongs in their company. Australia is a long way off, but this bloke is world-class.' Washington Post ' Bad Debts is wonderful, quintessentially Australian stuff, full of authentic, diehard types, old culture cops, backstreet humour and inner-city dialogue you can overhear in the bars of certain hotels, the ones with framed pictures of horses on the walls. it is the genuine article and an absolute pearler of a read.' Australian Book Review 'Like his characters, Temple has a spare, funny delivery, and a sharp eye for a target...Temple writes with the urgency of someone who wants to disrupt an official investigation, and his story is kept up like taut wire. Brothers and sisters in crime, worship at the Temple.' Australian 'Temple can be as tough as nails, but also displays a wickedly droll sense of humour which, like the work of, say, the American writer Joe R. Lansdale, frequently has the reader holding his sides with laughter even while immersed in some particularly unpleasant scenario...With Bad Debts Temple has created a world-class novel.' Sydney Morning Herald
    For over 350 million years, thousands of species of amphibians have lived on earth, but since the 1990s they have been disappearing at an alarming rate, in many cases quite suddenly and mysteriously. What is causing these extinctions? What role do human actions play in them? What do they tell us about the overall state of biodiversity on the planet? In Extinction in Our Times , James Collins and Martha Crump explore these pressing questions and many others as they document the first modern extinction event across an entire vertebrate class.
    The Oxford Handbook of Developmental Behavioral Neuroscience is a seminal reference work in the burgeoning field of developmental behavioral neuroscience, which has emerged in recent years as an important sister discipline to developmental psychobiology.
    While social capital theorists have studied the consequences of having effective social networks, few have examined why some people have better networks than others. This book argues that the answer lies less in people's deliberate "networking" than in the institutional conditions of the churches, colleges, firms, gyms, and other organizations in which they routinely participate.
    Here, Philip Bobbitt studies the basis for the legitimacy of judicial review by examining six types of constitutional argument--historical, textual, structural, prudential doctrinal, and ethical--through the unusual method of contrasting sketches of prominent legal figures responding to the constitutional crises of their day.
    Making high-quality professional recordings requires the right balance of technical know-how and practical understanding of recording sessions. Getting the best audio recording results often requires as much common sense and intuitiveness in technique as it does a deep understanding of the technical elements involved. In The Art of Digital Audio Recording , expert author Steve Savage synthesizes years of professional recording experience - including 7 Grammy-nominated records - and his teaching experience as instructor in recording techniques to equip professional readers with both the essential technical as well as practical knowledge they need to succeed.
    Focusing on the music of the great song composers--Schubert, Schumann, Brahms, Wolf, and Strauss-- Poetry Into Song offers a systematic introduction to the performance and analysis of Lieder .
    This book presents a comprehensive study of the most famous and spectacular instance of inflation in modern industrial society--that in Germany during and following World War I. A broad, probing narrative, this book studies inflation as a strategy of social pacification and economic reconstruction and as a mechanism for escaping domestic and international indebtedness. The Great Disorder is a study of German society under the tension of inflation and hyperinflation, and it explores the ways in which Germany's hyperinflation and stabilization were linked to the Great Depression and the rise of National Socialism. This wide-ranging study sets German inflation within the broader issues of maintaining economic stability, social peace, and democracy and thus contributes to the general history of the twentieth century and has important implications for existing and emerging market economies facing the temptation or reality of inflation.
    President Obama recently called for a new financial regulation system in the United States. In order to understand the intricacies of new regulation, individuals must have a strong foundation in how capital markets function as well as how financial instruments and derivatives work. Capital Markets, Derivatives, and the Law provides readers with the foundation necessary to make informed, well-reasoned decisions about capital market participation, derivative utilization, and adherence to existing and future regulations.
    This collection presents intriguing explanations of extraordinary musical creations from across the world, concentrating on how the music works as sound in process. It suggests analytical approaches that apply across cultures, proposes a new way of classifying music, and treats provocative questions about the juxtaposition of music from different cultures.
    Jury selection is the process by which attorneys remove people from the jury pool whom they judge to be undesirable, presumably because they fear that the potential juror would be biased against their side. In Jury Selection, Kovera and Cutler review the law governing attorneys' decisions to remove potential jurors from jury service, including laws prohibiting the systematic removal of particular categories of people from the jury.
    Sexual conflict -- what happens when the reproductive interests of males and females diverge -- occurs in all sexually reproducing species, including humans. The Oxford Handbook of Sexual Conflict in Humans is the first volume to assemble the latest theoretical and empirical work on sexual conflict in humans from the leading scholars in the fields of evolutionary psychology and anthropology.
    This volume brings together leading experts in comparative and evolutionary psychology, highlighting exciting and controversial advances in the field. Top scholars summarize the histories and possible futures of their disciplines, and the contribution of each to illuminating the evolutionary forces that give rise to unique abilities in distantly and closely related species.
    Yoga for Singing presents vocal students and professionals, voice teachers, and movement instructors (many of whom include a significant amount of yoga in stage movement and dance courses required in conservatory vocal/opera programs as well as in pre-professional apprentice programs) with a unique approach to technique and performance improvement that fits the increasing interest in and prevalence of yoga practices.
    What is happiness? How is it related to morality and virtue? Does living with illusion promote or diminish happiness? Is it better to pursue happiness with a partner than alone? Philosopher Mike W. Martin addresses these and other questions as he connects the meaning of happiness with the philosophical notion of "the good life.
    Everywhere and Nowhere offers a clear, empirical analysis of the state of contemporary feminism while also revealing the fascinating and complex development of feminist communities in the United States.
    Tausret reveals the relatively unknown story of one of the only women to ever rule ancient Egypt as a king. This book brings together distinguished scholars whose research and excavations have recovered the history of this nearly forgotten female pharaoh.
    Alfred Hitchcock's American films are not only among the most admired works in world cinema, they also offer some of our most acute responses to the changing shape of American society in the 1940s, 50s, and 60s. The authors of this anthology show how famous films such as Strangers on a Train , Vertigo , North by Northwest , and Rear Window , along with more obscure ones such as Rope , The Wrong Man , and Family Plot , register the ideologies and insurgencies, the normative assumptions and the cultural alternatives, that shaped these tumultuous decades. They argue that, just as these films occupy a visual landscape defined by the grand monuments of American civic life--Mt. Rushmore, the Statue of Liberty, the United Nations--they are also marked by their preoccupation with the social mores and private practices of mid-century America. Not only are big-city and suburban life the explicit subjects of films like Rear Window and Shadow of a Doubt , so are the forms of experience that emerge within these social spaces, whether the urban voyeurism examined by the former or the intertwining of banality and violence depicted in the latter. Indeed, just about every form of American life that was achieving social power at this time--the national security state; the science and art of psychoanalysis; the privileging of the free-wheeling, improvisatory self; the postwar codification and fissuring of gender roles; road-culture and its ancillary creation, the motel--is given detailed, critical, and mordant examination in Hitchcocks films. The Hitchcock who emerges is not merely the inspired technician and psychological excavator that critics of the past two generations have justly hailed; he is also a cultural critic of remarkable insight and undeniable prescience.
    In Shared Responsibility, Shared Risk, Jacob Hacker and Ann O'Leary have gathered a distinguished group of scholars on American social policy to address the fundamental problems facing the American social welfare system. Collectively, they analyze how the "privatization of risk" has increased hardships for American families and increased inequality. They also propose a series of solutions that would distribute the burdens of risks more broadly and expand the social safety net.
    A fresh addition to an enormous body of scholarship, this will be required reading for academics interested in the relationship between politics and non-political systems of thoughts and beliefs, the transnational circulation of ideas, social movements, and the intellectual and social history of psychoanalysis.
    Based on an analysis of more than 300 print advertisements as well as television commercials and recruiting websites, this book explores how the U.S. military branches have deployed gender and, in particular, ideas about masculinity to sell military service to potential recruits during the all-volunteer force.
    Nobel Prize winner Thomas Schelling taught a course in game theory and rational choice to advanced students and government officials for 45 years. In this book, Robert Dodge provides in language for a broad audience the concepts that Schelling taught. Armed with Schelling's understanding of game theory methods and his approaches to problems, the general reader can improve daily decision making.
    This is the most up-to-date collection of essays by the leading proponent of process reliabilism, refining and clarifying that theory and critiquing its rivals. The volume features important essays on the internalism/externalism debate, epistemic value, the intuitional methodology of philosophy, and social epistemology.
    This book explores the post-national defense and its gender implications. Specifically, it explores how the United Nations Security Council resolution to increase the participation of women in peace negotiations, humanitarian planning, peacekeeping operations, post-conflict peacebuilding and governance has influenced the organization and policy practices of the post-national defense.
    Ravel the Decadent offers a bold new perspective on the music of Maurice Ravel by locating its aesthetic origins in the French Decadence and demonstrating this influence across the length of his oeuvre. The notions of memory, sublimation, and desire are invoked to delineate the Decadent profile of this music.
    Lynda Lasswell Crist, Editor Mary Seaton Dix, Coeditor Introduction by Frank E. VandiverVolume 7 of The Papers of Jefferson Davis offers a unique view of 1861, the first year of the Confederacy, Davis' presidency, and the Civil War.On January 21 Davis made his affecting farewell speech before a hushed Senate, then left for Mississippi. His uncertainty over a military or political course vanished when he received news of his unanimous election as president of the Confederate States of America. Inaugurated at Montgomery, Alabama, on February 18, Davis quickly set to work to forge a government, in a race with events to select a cabinet, establish departments, and plan for the common defense.Hopes for a peaceful separation from the North ended with the firing on Fort Sumter; subsequent documents reveal a president absorbed by the problems of waging a war that soon stretched from the Atlantic Coast to the Gulf of Mexico. Victory at Manassas produced euphoria among southerners but plunged the president into the first of several unfortunate controversies with his generals, this one over the failure to pursue the enemy and capitalize on success.Throughout 1861 the Confederate commissioners in Europe reported to Davis on their expectations of recognition, convinced that the demand for cotton would induce Great Britain and France to break the North's blockade of southern ports and help supply arms for the defense of the fledgling nation.Volume 7 provides a rare opportunity to assess anew Davis' strengths and weaknesses as executive, to reexamine his relationship with generals, governors, congressmen, cabinet officers, the press, and the public. Davis ended the year as he begun, aware of the difficulties of the course the South had adopted and confident that its cause would ultimately triumph. Containing illustrations, maps, and more than 2,500 documents drawn from numerous printed sources and more than seventy repositories and private collections, Volume 7 covers a year of paramount importance in our country's history.
    This book explores evolving concepts of the complex nature of pain through a mixture of neuroscience, psychology, and philosophy of science. It provides a glimpse into potential new frontiers of pain research and treatment.
    Heart Failure synthesizes established clinical guidelines for the management of heart failure in an easy-to-use handbook for busy clinicians.
    Like Elizabeth David, Claudia Roden can write about anything. Whether it's Middle Eastern, Spanish or Italian food, she is the cook to turn to. She is world renowned for her classic books like Arabesque and the Book of Jewish Food. These draw on her Egyptian Jewish roots so it's no wonder Middle Eastern chefs like Ottolenghi are among her biggest fans. But it is interesting to see that Russell Norman of Polpo cites Food of Italy as his favourite cookbook . Polpo is very cool, very modern, very Italian and yet still Claudia Roden's classic is his go-to cookbook. Food of Italy was first published 25 years ago next year. But the recipes are so fresh yet timeless they are hard to date. For this edition she has updated over 30% of the recipes to fit modern tastes with new inclusions like farro salad and burrata. The book is structured by region. So you get the glorious tomato and aubergine dishes of Sicily; the classically Roman dishes like salty meat and fried vegetables, and rich Tuscan stews and soups, and so on. With over 300 short recipes it is an incredible repertoire, and it is completely approachable for home cooks. This fully illustrated edition includes recipe photos as well as local Italy scenes. This is the first time it has had photos since it was originally published.
    This Handbook is a unique compendium of thinking, research, and practice on organizational climate and culture, integrating scholarship from both fields into one major work. Authors explore these themes in context of contemporary practice with comprehensive case studies of 3M, McDonald's, the Mayo Clinic, PepsiCo and Tata.
    Conflict Resolution for the Helping Professions is the only current conflict resolution textbook designed specifically for social work, psychology, criminal justice, counseling, and related professions. Barsky provides an array of evidence-based approaches to negotiation, mediation, advocacy, and other collaborative processes. Learn effective methods of managing conflicts with clients, co-workers, family members, and friends. Interesting case examples and exercises will help you integrate theory and put conflict resolution skills into practice.
    The chapters in Patient Care and Professionalism are ordered so that the main character in this book, the patient, has the first voice, followed by the ancient history of professionalism, the recent resurrection of professionalism in the United Kingdom (UK), and finally professionalism in the United States (US). The eleven chapters cover the various health care professions: medicine, nursing, public health, law, leadership, religion, and finally a chapter on the science of professionalism. The chapters are all written by internationally known experts.
    Written by recognized experts in their respective fields, the books of the Series in Specialty Competencies in Professional Psychology are comprehensive, up-to-date, and accessible. These volumes offer invaluable guidance to not only practicing mental health professionals, but those training for specialty practice as well.

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