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    Exclusively ours, this Vampire Diaries mouse pad features Elena, Damon, and Stefan in front on an imposing moon. The mouse pad is made of high density foam with an easy to clean, stain resistant finish. Measures approximately 7 3/4 inches x 9 inches.
    This Harry Potter themed mouse pad features the official logo of Diagon Alley's most famous bookstore, Flourish & Blotts. Exclusively ours, this mouse pad is made of high density foam with an easy to clean, stain resistant finish. Measures approximately 7 3/4 inches x 9 inches. Makes a great gift!
    This Harry Potter themed mouse pad features a bright, colorful image of the official Hufflepuff Crest. Exclusively ours, this mouse pad is made of high density foam with an easy to clean, stain resistant finish. Measures approximately 7 3/4 inches x 9 inches. Makes a great gift!
    This breathtaking adventure explodes into animated action when the villainous Mr. Freeze kidnaps Batgirl. Now, racing the clock, Batman and Robin face off against Mr. Freeze in the iciest showdown of the century.
    Exclusively ours, this fun Looney Tunes mouse pad features Bugs Bunny, Sylvester, Tweety, and Taz merrily running into the water with their surf boards, ignoring the sharks! The mouse pad is made of high density foam with an easy to clean, stain resistant finish. Measures approximately 7 3/4 inches x 9 inches. Makes a great gift!
    Four passionate people. Two burning romances. Leo Tolstoy's powerful novel of love in 1880s Imperial Russia glows anew in lavish splendor from the acclaimed writer/director of Candyman, Immortal Beloved and Ivansxtc. Shot entirely in and around St. Petersburg, it is set to a majestic soundtrack of music by Tchaikovsky, Rachamaninoff and Prokofiev. Wealth. Prestige. Family. Anna (Braveheart's Sophie Marceau) has them all in her marriage to aristocratic Karenin (James Fox). Then dashing Count Vronsky (Sean Bean) enters her world of ballroom dances, ornate palaces and pastoral dachas. But where romance sweeps Anna along uncontrollably, landowner Levin (Alfred Molina) struggles to nurture his delicate love with heartbroken Kitty (Mia Kirshner). Both tales unfold in spellbinding fashion as this fifth and most dazzling film of Tolstoy's masterwork memorably explores the power of the heart and its consequences.
    The first super hero created for comic books, Superman leaped from radio to television when Adventures of Superman debuted in 1952. Produced by Robert J. Maxwell (who also produced the radio version) and Bernard Luber (a veteran of Hollywood serials), each episode screens like a classic crime movie, where danger and death lurk in the shadows. Seasons 5 and 6 are the final seasons of this classic TV favorite.
    As far as the CIA and the KGB are concerned, the only good ex-spy is a dead one. After all, who knows what sensitive information an old spook may divulge? So in a chilling example of Cold War cooperation, the rivals strike a bargain to liquidate ex-agents either side wants offed. Next on their list: Gabriel Lee, an American agent who defected to the East, then decided to switch sides again. Lee's only hope of survival is the aid of another former spy, his aging mentor in the dangerous game of espionage - and the husband of Lee's one-time flame. Richard Widmark, Oliver Reed and Gayle Hunnicutt star in a complex cat-and-mouse thriller packed with double-crosses, conflicted motives and car-chasing, bomb-blasting action.
    How would World War II veterans adjust to life on the postwar home front? Violence is a trim, noir-edged thriller wrapped around a then-topical story of a racketeering organization that recruits angry war veterans into its violent agenda.
    Spring is here and Yogi and Boo Boo wake up from hibernation only to find that some major changes have taken place while they slept the winter away. Jellystone Park is closing down! No more Jellystone Park means no more tourists, and that means no more picnic baskets to pilfer! Yogi, Boo Boo and their new friends, the bear cub triplets, take off in Yogi's homemade getaway mobile - the Supercar - in search of a new home. All the while Ranger Smith, bounty hunter Trapper and his hound dog Yapper are hot on their tails! Some familiar cartoon faces make an appearance on this cross-country trip filled with fun, friends and famous American landmarks!
    April 14, 1865. As four year of Civil War draw to a close, our country again faces unforgettable tragedy: the assassination of the President. Starring Lance Henriksen as the Great Emancipator and Rob Morrow as assassin John Wilkes Booth, this riveting recreation of The Day Lincoln Was Shot (from Jim Bishop's landmark book) is a thrilling and detailed chronicle of the plot, murder and manhunt that changed America forever. To avenge what he called the Confederacy's "noble cause," Booth conspires with his motley followers, rages and boasts, and aspires to a place in history as a Great Man. The weary Lincoln, longing for a just peace, meets with his Cabinet, steals precious time with his family and dreams - literally - of the death of a President. Minute by minute, killer and victim edge closer to the burst of gunfire at Ford's Theatre that stopped Lincoln's heart - and shattered the country's soul.
    Kirk Douglas, Edward G. Robinson and Cyd Charisse star in Academy Award-winning director Vincente Minelli's film of a failing movie star who travels to a shoot in Rome and salvages his life and his career over the course of Two Weeks in Another Town.Jack Andrus (Douglas--Spartacus, Seven Days in May) rode a meteoric rise to stardom, but he now seems to be in an equally dramatic tailspin in both his life and his career after a bout of alcoholism, a bitter divorce and a stay in a mental hospital. Now, when he's asked to work on a film in Rome by director Maurice Kruger (Robinson--Double Indemnity), Andrus quickly accepts--without realizing how much this one film will change his life.
    Unemployed Polly Parrish (Ginger Rogers) impulsively picks up a baby left at orphanage doors at Christmas. Everyone assumes the foundling is hers, including Polly's playboy ex-boss (David Niven), who offers her a job if she'll live up to her maternal duties. A paycheck would be handy, so Polly complies. Then the boss's tycoon dad (Charles Coburn) assumes the infant is his secret grandson.and things really spin out of control. Buoyed by Rogers' irresistibly endearing performance, Bachelor Mother is one of those rarities, a brilliantly cast comedy where everything - plot, pacing and dialogue (thanks to Garson Kanin's savvy direction and Norman Krasna's witty script) - is exactly, hilariously right.
    Playing in a rock'n'roll band and saving the undersea world from diabolical villains? An impossible task for most, but not for Jabberjaw, the 15-foot talking Great White shark from the fan-favorite Saturday morning cartoon series. The year is 2076 and Jabberjaw is the star of the Neptunes, a teenage rock group. In his spare time, Jabberjaw, along with teens Biffy, Shelly, Bubbles and Clamhead, fight deep-sea crime. But it's tough down there for a shark. Jabberjaw must also contend with the robot force of "Shark Ejectors," guards who prevent sharks from entering into underwater cities. All he wants is a little respect! Catch the tidal wave of adventure, music and laughter in this animated collection.
    Get spooked with ghost hunters Gilly, Ted and Tina as they travel the globe from Scotland to South America with their reluctant pooch Goober on a search for paranormal action in this fondly remembered animated treat from Hanna-Barbera Productions. Full of good intentions and false bravado, Goober stands at the ready asking, "Who's afraid of ghosts?" Turns out, he is! His distinctive striped hat is the only evidence he leaves behind when a ghost appears. Uncover urban legends, unmask bumbling crooks and solve wacky mysteries with popular guest stars like basketball legend Wilt Chamberlain and singing sensations the Partridge Family kids - Laurie, Danny, Chris and Tracy (voiced by actors Susan Dey, Danny Bonaduce, Brain Foster and Suzanne Crough). Spooktacular fun will haunt you in this 4-Disc, 16-Episode Goober and the Ghost Chasers Complete Series Collection!
    The souls in question are silver-screen hopefuls in this witty, insightful glimpse at the early movie business. Feared lost for decades, it includes unique working cameos of director Erich von Stroheim and a non-Tramp Charlie Chaplin, and features starlet Eleanor Boardman, the "Cinderella of Hollywood" whose rags-to-riches story echoed her character's. Escaping from a train journey with her sinister new husband, Mem Steddon (Boardman) crawls across the California desert and spies her salvation: an Arab sheik riding a camel! The location movie crew brings Mem to Tinseltown, where bit parts and acting lessons lead her to starring roles - and a fiery finale with her murderous spouse Lew Cody). If you like classic Hollywood, you'll love this picture, full of carefully observed detail, warmth and plenty of soul.
    WBLA is on the air, presenting the live music, the sudsy dramas and the sell-sell-sell of commercial interludes that keep consumers buying and sponsors smiling. But one sponsor, a producer of plumbing supplies, isn't happy. So WBLA scriptwriter Bill Grimes is bounced from his job, setting in motion this movie's turn from comedic to darkly tragic. William Haines, two years removed from being Tinseltown's top male star, plays Grimes in a melodrama noted for its glimpses of live radio production and for a Depression-era ethos that includes peroxide cuties eager to land a job, a sugar daddy or both. The cast includes Hattie McDaniel in a bit role. Are You Listening? Don't touch that dial.
    James Lydon stars as David Langham, an enterprising youth with an eye for the girls and an ear for a well-tuned high-compression machine. And his dad (Art Baker) happens to be a small town judge.
    Wish fulfillment meets wit in a sassy, sophisticated 1934 comedy that told a girl how to succeed in business in an era when success meant marrying the boss, not nabbing the corner office. Blonde charmer Laura La Plante (in one of her last films in a career that included her reign as one of the silent screen's leading stars) goes dowdy in the title role, playing meek Betty Miller, who's much better at dictation than flirtation. In fact, she's just what banker Johnathan Steele (Ian Hunter) wants - someone who won't take his mind off business. Then Betty meets Steele's va-va-voom previous secretary (and current mistress) and learns what a splash of perfume and personality can do for a girl, especially one with a promotion to Mrs. on her mind!
    Make 'em powerful, make 'em topical, and make 'em fast! One of the hallmarks of the 1930s at Warner Bros. was the studio's string of muscular, social-conscience B programmers that championed the downtrodden. Road Gang, scripter Dalton Trumbo's account of a reform-minded journalist (Donald Woods) unjustly sentenced to a brutal prison work camp, revisits the terrain of the studio's influential I Am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang. Next, frequent screen villain Barton MacLane plays the heroic leader of a desperate, 10-day effort to reach survivors of a mine cave-in in Draegerman Courage, a sturdy screen wallop that some say draws on a real-life incident. Brace for impact with these two rock-solid standouts!
    The California Dolls are hot, young and dirty (well, muddy). But although the gorgeous tag-team wrestlers may be wallowing in a down-market mud-wrestling bout right now, they have a dream: the championship match at the MGM Grand in Reno. Director Robert Aldrich's (The Dirty Dozen, What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?) last film is a boisterous, body-slammin' blast. The fun comes from the ladies who aim for glory, one takedown at a time; from Peter Falk as the team's irrepressible manager who battles the odds as ferociously as the girls battle in the ring; and from a grand finale smackdown that will leave you cheering.
    Eugene Ferguson pledged to help people when he became a doctor, but will he perform a life-saving surgery on a South American tyrant who's taken him captive? Yes, if Ferguson hopes to leave the troubled land. No, if he heeds the threats made by revolutionaries determined to overthrow the despot. Cary Grant plays Ferguson, a physician navigating the unexpected terrain between a rock and a hard place in this political thriller that's the directorial debut of Richard Brooks. The role is a change of pace for Grant, and he prepared for it with diligent study and observation of surgical procedures. The result is a portrayal rooted in reality and put across with the uncanny talent of one of film's greatest stars.
    The Western became a staple of filmmaking as far back as 1903's The Great Train Robbery, but it took some 50 years for the industry at large to provide films sympathetic to Native Americans - via works such as Broken Arrow, Devil's Doorway and this Technicolor® tale of The Half-Breed. Robert Young portrays fair-minded Dan Craig, whose arrival in Arizona Territory's San Remo puts him at odds with conspirators eager to ignite an Apache uprising and thereby lay claim to gold-rich reservation land. Jack Buetel (Billy the Kid in The Outlaw) plays the title role in this lively powder keg of a movie filmed in part amid the craggy red spires of Sedona.
    Take heart, Depression-era America: the nation has faced dire economic crises in years past and with pluck, honest work and persistence has pulled itself aright. The Conquerors combines its morale-boosting message with a tale of one family's lives and times, misfortunes and fortunes from 1873 to 1930. Richard Dix, star of the prior year's sprawling Cimarron, plays dual roles as smalltown banker Roger Standish and his grandson (in a filmmaking virtuosity rare for the era, the two share the final sequence). The passage of time and events is conveyed in acclaimed montages by Slavko Vorkapich, whose masterly visual compressions also grace David Copperfield, The Good Earth and other classics.
    Jim Bowie is learning the courtly ways of 1825 Southern society. He's wearing only the finest suits and cravats. Proving himself in business and at the gaming table. And should the occasion call, keeping handy the specially made blade - tempered with meteorite steel - that would make his name forever a part of American lore. Yet despite Bowie's prowess in a world of dandies and ruffians, he may be overmatched in the ways of the heart: he's fallen for lovely Jubalon, the magnolia belle fancied by men of means from Natchez to New Orleans. Will her beauty be the only weapon more powerful than Bowie's Iron Mistress blade?
    Bulldog-faced, bullmoose-framed Marie Dressler would never win a beauty contest, but her powerful turn as a blowzy sot in Anna Christie opposite Greta Garbo won her a legion of devoted fans. In The Girl Said No, her next film, she again hit the bottle. But this time she played a grouchy grande dame unused to the Demon Rum in a laugh-'til-you-gasp scene that made her reputation as one of the Early Talkie Era's great comediennes. The story follows a brash young man (William Haines) out to make his fortune. His means: sell a passel of 7% bonds. His mark: wealthy Hettie Brown (Dressler). His method: ply the old biddy with booze until she signs on the dotted line. The result: a fall-down-funny (literally) comedy sequence.
    The way surfer dude Mitchell Goosen sees it, there are two kinds of people: those who surf and those who don't. So when Mitch (Shane McDermott) relocates from surfside California to wintry landlocked Cincinnati, there's just one thing he can do: put on skates and get Airborne!Mitch's skates and principles are put to the test in this stylin' comedy co-starring Seth Green (the Austin Powers and Family Guy series) and Brittney Powell. Members of Team RollerbladeO add awesome in-line skating stunts and the soundtrack is filled with hot tracks by Ugly Kid Joe, Jeremy Jordan, Steve Miller Band and more. To air isn't just human, dudes. It's necessary. Get Airborne!
    Three L.A. gold diggers make the pilgrimage to Las Vegas in search of rich husbands. Romance and comedy ensue, buoyed by the songs of Irving Caesar, Rodgers and Hart, and many others in this musical comedy. From the director of "Calamity Jane" and "Lullaby of Broadway, featuring Virginia Mayo ("The Best Years of Our Lives"), Dennis Morgan ("Kitty Foyle"), Gene Nelson ("Oklahoma!") and Virginia Gibson ("Seven Brides for Seven Brothers").
    English bwanas wind their way through uncharted territory toward the homeland of the hostile Wazuri. There, they hope to lay hands on diamonds they say are needed for Britain's armaments. But the entire safari is a ruse. Its leaders are jewel thieves who've duped Tarzan into being their guide.The Ape-Man has a fierce fight on his hands in this fourth Tarzan film starring Lex Barker.
    It says a lot about George Hamilton's acting skills that his first credited performance was this starring - and very demanding - role. He shines as Robert Cole, a troubled young man with a troubling belief: Exceptional people shouldn't have to pay for their crimes. After blacking out near the scene of a murder, Cole captures the attention of the police and proceeds to play a deadly cat-and-mouse game with a tenacious cop, a beautiful stranger and a family foe.1950s Southern California is as far from 19th-century Moscow as you can get. or is it? By radically changing the setting of Dostoevski's Crime and Punishment, this moody thriller makes the dusty classic new, fresh and dangerous once again. Literary fans will be impressed, and film fans will delight in being reunited with this unique, sun-drenched, jazz-tinged noir opus.
    Ah Rome, land of amore, pasta and a whole lotta bedrooms - if you're Ray Hunter (Dean Martin), a hotel baron who stops in to buy a luxury hotel and stays to stage-manage the romantic lives of four comely Italian sisters. Lavishly filmed on location, Ten Thousand Bedrooms marks Martin's first film after he parted company with his longtime show-biz partner Jerry Lewis. And it's an ideal match of star and vehicle, showcasing the star's mellow pipes and relaxed style of wooing. Martin would go on to establish himself as a fine dramatic actor in such films as The Young Lions, Some Came Running and Rio Bravo, but it's carefree, swingin'-bachelor characters like Ray that many fans will always associate with Dino.
    Classic Hollywood offers another compassionate melodrama of the heart in his tale of a woman who loves unwisely, flees her past and finds new love.only to have the past cast its shadow on her happiness. Kay Francis plays Belinda Warren, the trusting plaything of a titled Englishman (Patric Knowles) with an invalid wife. Belinda gives birth to their child, and then lets her caddish lover adopt the baby. Later she marries a good man (George Brent), but the memory of her lost child haunts her, threatening to tear her marriage apart. The film's poignancy is comically offset by deliciously wry work from co-star Roland Young and elegantly offset by chic flats, tinkling cocktail glasses and a knockout array of bias-cut gowns for the heartbroken leading lady.
    When a European diplomat is named ambassador to the United States, he relocates to Washington, D.C., with his niece, Princess Maria, where he hopes she'll meet an eligible American bachelor. On a side trip by plane to San Francisco, Maria takes a tranquilizer to settle her nerves, passes out in mid-flight, and is out for hours. The pilot, Eddie O'Rourke, volunteers to put her up at his place for the night, and when Maria awakens, she is taken with Eddie's decency and charm, and it is love at first sight. However, Maria's uncle was hoping for her to meet someone higher up the social ladder than a pilot, and the couple has an uphill battle getting him to consent to their wedding. Starring, Academy Award-winner Olivia De Havilland as the princess, Emmy Award-winner Robert Cummings as the pilot, and Academy Award-winner Charles Coburn as the uncle. An Academy Award winner for Best Original Screenplay.
    Can love bridge the gap between Earth and Heaven? Moviemakers have thought so for decades. And the pursuit of eternal bliss has never been so sly, engaging or magical as when Timothy Hutton and Kelly McGillis strike up a romance Made in Heaven. Deceased drifter Mike (Hutton) arrives in Heaven and quickly falls for newborn soul Annie (McGillis), soon to start her assignment on Earth. When Annie leaves, Mike follows, risking all to find her in her new identity with neither having memories of their previous celestial existence.
    Screen greats and off-screen married couple Al Jolson and Ruby Keeler go into their dance with their only movie pairing. The story is a quick-stepping back stager, with Jolson as an irresponsible stage star beholden to a gangster and Keeler as a devoted hoofer who helps the star launch a new show. The cast includes torch singer Helen Morgan. And the production's ties to the landmark 42nd Street are many: Keeler made her screen debut in that film, Harry Warren and Al Dubin return to offer irresistible tunes (with ritzy staging showcasing About a Quarter to Nine and A Latin from Manhattan) and a story by Bradford Ropes, whose novel inspired 42nd Street, is the basis for this film's mix of musical and melodrama. Curtain up!
    A pretty schoolgirl is murdered. An ambitious prosecutor wants publicity. And an outsider - a Northern teacher in a sleepy Southern town - makes a handy defendant, someone the locals will happily convict, innocent or guilty. Based on the infamous Leo Frank case, They Won't Forget is an explosive, acclaimed indictment of bigotry that's rich in deceptive motives, sudden violence and courtroom suspense. The talent is as powerful as the story: Mervyn LeRoy (I Am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang) produced and directed with steady hand and crackling pacing, Robert Rossen (The Hustler) co-wrote the unflinching script, Claude Rains (Casablanca) etches a portrait of the ruthless prosecutor with poison and guile, and in her first credited role, Lana Turner makes the schoolgirl beguiling prey for an unhinged mind.
    Debbie Reynolds and Tony Randall star as a beautiful farmer's daughter and a stuffy tax investigator who find love and a lot of money when they play The Mating Game.When Internal Revenue Service agent Lorenzo Charleton (Randall) arrives on the farm of Ma and Pop Larkin (Paul Douglas and Una Merkel) to investigate why they have never paid taxes, he discovers their indomitable daughter, Mariette (Reynolds); their homemade moonshine ... and the fact that the government actually owes the Larkins $14 million.Based on the novel Darling Buds of May by H.E. Bates.
    With large confidence and an even larger hat, cattleman Calvin Jones (rubber-faced comic Joe E.Brown) rolls along the lighted cow path of Broadway. He has $20,000 to invest in a show, intending to skedaddle back to Texas with his profits. Faster than you can say flopperoo, the producers of the show Calvin bankrolls button it up and keep the dough. Now add mobsters eager to extort some cash and romance with a perky secretary (Ginger Rogers), and it's clear Calvin's got some wrangling to do before he's back in those wide-open spaces. George S. Kaufman's fish-out-of-water stage farce The Butter and Egg Man (Richard Carle shares an on-screen story credit) hits town as The Tenderfoot. Yeeee-haw, Manhattan!
    Cracking Up is a crazy quilt of sight gags, one-liners, caricatures, slapstick and quirky vocal mannerisms. In short, it's marvelous mayhem of the kind which has gained Jerry Lewis admirers the world over. Lewis plays a hapless misfit who seeks psychiatric help after bumbling a suicide attempt. His shrink sessions reveal a flashback history about a klutzy childhood and a family history of (what else?) ineptitude, affording Lewis to play a smorgasbord of roles, including a 6-year-old boy, a 15th-century coachman, a good-ol'-boy sheriff and a bearded guru. The wackiness soars to new heights when our nutcase patient takes a transcontinental flight on the cheapest airline he can find. But there's no scrimping on the laughter. Cracking Up is zany proof that nobody does funny making filmmaking better than Lewis.
    The couple from A Man And A Woman meet again twenty years after their romantic affair, and although both have grown and changed in their life and loves, their romance rekindles.
    "No stranger from Africa can turn the course of our destiny." But never underestimate a stranger named Tarzan (Jock Mahoney). Over miles and obstacles, he will lead the young heir to Thailand's spiritual throne to his ordination and undo warlord Khan's (Woody Strode) plot to secure the title for his son. First however, the Ape-Man must prove to the heir that he is Tarzan by passing tests of skill, strength and wisdom. Ahead lies a still greater challenge: Tarzan vs. Khan in a bungee-jumping, sword-clanging, flame-dancing death duel! This second and last of Mahoney's Tarzans (filmed to colorful effect in Thailand) was not without real-life challenges: illness caused Mahoney to lose 40 pounds from his taut, athletic frame.
    What happens when a bookworm and a juvenile delinquent find their academic records accidentally switched on the first day of school? In this hip-hop comedy, they use the mix-up to their advantage as the model student needs help to pass physical education class ... and the delinquent wants to escape his reform school past.
    Friendship. It's there for the good times. It's invaluable for the bad times. Jerry and Matthew have each other to rely on as they cope on New York City's mean streets. They also have a dream: to work their way back into the mainstream. Danny Glover and Matt Dillon give finely etched portrayals of life on society's fringe in this moving tale of friendship directed by Tim Hunter (Tex, River's Edge). Glover, who prepared for his role by going incognito as a "street person," is Jerry, a man who did everything right but was blindsided by fate. Dillon is Matthew, who slipped through a crack in the bureaucratic system and onto the streets. Equipped with buckets and squeegees, the two friends have a lot of work ahead. And a lot of heart to see themselves through.
    She's new to San Francisco and a bit lonely. Maybe that's why Cathy Palmer (Carol White) is vulnerable to Kenneth (Scott Hylands), a playful, boyishly handsome stranger about to plunge her into a living nightmare. Cathy falls in and out of love with Kenneth, then begins life anew with another man (Paul Burke) whom she marries. But Kenneth isn't over Cathy: he stalks her - and kidnaps her newborn child. Veteran director Mark Robson recaptures the raw-edged intensity he displayed in the Val Lewton thrillers he helmed in the 1940s. Working from a taut script by top thriller specialists Larry Cohen and Lorenzo Semple Jr., Robson layers scene after scene with disquieting dread. Daddy's Gone A-Hunting taps into the real fear of a mistake coming back to haunt us - and delivers the nerve-wracking excitement suspense fans are always hunting.
    Sailor beware! That sweet trick with the big eyes is looking for more than a good time. She wants a ring! As bad-boy tar Jack Kelly, silent-film leading man William Haines brings his trademark humor, charm and amazing good looks to his first Talkie and proves to be as hear-worthy as he is see-worthy. So successful was Haines's transition to sound that in 1930, one year after Navy Blues was released, he reigned as Hollywood's #1 male box-office star. This nifty little comedy-drama touting the value of a good woman's love features Anita Page (Haines's co-star in the hit Speedway) as the girl who, after some heartache, ties a sailor's knot around Jack's heart. "I ain't the marrying kind," Jack declares. Wanna bet, sailor?
    West Point. The pride of America, the home of glorious tradition - unless you're a hotshot plebe named Brice Wayne. Then it's just a backdrop to personal glory. William Haines stars as Brice and Joan Crawford plays the girl he loves in a comedy-drama about a brash young gridiron hero who puts himself above the corps, learns a bitter lesson in team spirit and charges into the Army-Navy game for a chance to redeem himself. That on-screen spark between Haines and Crawford was reflected in off-screen camaraderie. The two, who would be named male and female box-office champs in 1930, became devoted lifelong friends.
    Director William A. "Wild Bill" Wellman tackled all manner of subjects during his legendary career: war (Battleground, Wings), Hollywood (1937's A Star Is Born), exotic adventure (Beau Geste), crime (The Public Enemy) and, with The Happy Years, joyous, jim-dandy, turn-of-the-century Americana. Based on Owen Johnson's The Lawrenceville School Stories, the film stars Dean Stockwell as Dink Stover, whose concerned papa sends him to the posh prep school in hopes of turning the troublemaker into a responsible young man. Fisticuffs, feuds and football test the lad's mettle, but (of course) all comes right at the end. Deft and delightfully comic, The Happy Years happily evokes the charm and innocence of a lost era.
    Jim Blaine dares death every day as a barnstorming aviation pioneer. But when it comes to marrying the beautiful parachute jumper he's gone loop-de-loop for - well, that's scary. As Jim, Richard Barthelmess dons goggles and leather cap for adventure in the wild blue yonder under the brawny direction of a real aviation pioneer: World War I pilot William A. Wellman, whose Wings (1927) sent box office receipts into the stratosphere and won the first Best Picture Academy Award®. In Central Airport, Wellman displays his genius for creating action aloft with hold-your-breath aerial stunts and expert miniature work. Don't let the thrills distract you during the climax or you'll miss John Wayne as the heroic co-pilot of a downed plane.
    Suzanne Somers rocks the blues away in this sunny seaside adventure co-produced by future Academy Award winner* Brian Grazer. With career worries getting her down, fading rock star Bonnie Katt (Somers) heads to the beach, hoping to leave her troubles behind. Falling in with a crowd of teens, Bonnie's concerns soon become a thing of the past, as she casts her problems aside and helps her new friends solve a few of their own. Featuring an awesome line-up of soon-to-be-famous names including Timothy Hutton, Rosanna Arquette (Desperately Seeking Susan), Tanya Roberts (Charlie's Angels), P.J. Soles (Rock 'n' Roll High School), Michael Biehn (The Terminator) and co-writer John Carpenter (Halloween), Zuma Beach is a sizzlin' salute to surf, sand and Somers.
    Ex-Marine Ellie and shy bookworm Janis are fledgling female Feds who'd make Eliot Ness proud. More importantly, they'll make you laugh. Starring as these plucky FBI recruits are gangbuster comediennes Rebecca de Mornay (Risky Business, Wedding Crashers) and Mary Gross (Saturday Night Live, A Mighty Wind). "Brawny" Ellie and "brainy" Janis go together like ham and eggs, and their lives will be hilariously scrambled during their hilarious, hectic training. Janis must learn physicality and intimidation techniques, while Ellie needs a guiding hand to help get through the intricacies of constitutional law. So in true buddy fashion, they'll help each other prepare for the academy's final exam: a "simulated crime exercise" that chauvinistic lunkheads think will separate the men from the girls.

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