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The Decline of the Guru

The academic profession faces new challenges everywhere. The pressures of mass higher education, accountability, fiscal constraints, distance education and the new technologies, and changing attitudes concerning academic work have combined to place unprecedented strains on the professoriate. There is no country that has avoided these challenges, although the changes vary. This book brings together some of the best analysts of the academic profession in a wide ranging comparative analysis of the changing academic workplace. The stress here is on middle income and developing countries, but the issues discussed are relevant everywhere. This book, precisely because of its comparative and international perspective, is useful worldwide. Among the topics considered in the case study chapters are: – The changing demographics of the academic profession, including the role of gender in the professoriate – New developments in academic appointments, including the terms of academic work, evaluation of professors, and the tenure system – External pressures on the academic profession, including demands for accountability, threats to academic freedom, and others – The changing nature of academic work, including patterns of teaching and evaluation of students and increases in teaching responsibilities – The role of research in a changing academic environment – The impact of the new technologies and distance education – Future prospects for the professoriate.

The Decline of the Guru

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The American State Normal School

The American State Normal School is the first comprehensive history of the state normal schools in the United States. Although nearly two-hundred state colleges and regional universities throughout the U.S. began as ‘normal’ schools, the institutions themselves have buried their history, and scholars have largely overlooked them. As these institutions later became state colleges and/or regional universities, they distanced themselves from the low status of elementary-literally erasing physical evidence of their normal-school past. In doing so, they buried the rich history of generations of students for whom attending normal school was an enriching, and sometimes life-changing experience. Focusing on these students, the first wave of ‘non-traditional’ students in higher education, The American State Normal School is a much-needed re-examination of the state normal school.This book was subject of an annual History of Education Society panel for best new books in the field.

The American State Normal School

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Take Back Higher Education

At the beginning of the new millennium, higher education is under siege from right-wing ideologies and neo-liberalism. In this title, the authors argue that, if higher education is to meet the challenges of a democratic future, it must first confront neo-liberalism, racism and the shredding of the social contract.

Take Back Higher Education

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Science Literacy in Primary Schools and Pre-Schools

Science is more than a compilation of facts and figures, although one would not know that from observing classroom lessons in science in elementary schools in many parts of the world. In fact, there are those who argue that science is not appropriate subject content for the early grades of elementary school. There are many schools in which science is simply not present in the earliest grades. Even where science is taught in the earliest grades, it is often a caricature of science that is p- sented to the children. This book offers a vigorous, reasoned argument against the perspective that s- ence doesn’t belong in the early grades. It goes beyond that in offering a view of s- ence that is both appropriate to the early grades and faithful to the nature of the scientific enterprise. Dr. Eshach is not a voice in the chorus that claims young ch- dren’s developmental lack of readiness for such study. He believes, as do I, that in order to learn science one must do science. At the heart of the doing of science is the act of exploration and theory formation. To do science, we must explore the ways in which the world around us looks, sounds, smells, feels, and behaves.

Science Literacy in Primary Schools and Pre-Schools

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Creating the European Area of Higher Education

COM(91) 349 final and the Peripheries of European Higher Education Voldemar Tomusk Open Society Institute Budapest For a man who no longer has a homeland, writing becomes a place to live. Theodor Adorno, Minima Moralia 1. REDEMPTIVE IRONY OF STRATEGIES AND PROCESSES It is unfortunate to a degree that as soon as we begin discussing our human condition in the third millennium since mankind was offered its salvation, and the state of our institutions that structure and guide our existence as social beings in order not to act as beasts or mere social animals, we cannot avoid the word ironic’. For the people of intellectual calling who cannot but try to make sense of what is happening around, in and with us beyond digestion in the broad sense of the term, that is beyond the consuming the resources of the earth, ironic is the word without which nothing can be said any longer. Deliver Us from Irony’ is the title of a recent paper by a young historian discussing the last great post-modern historian Hayden White in his approach of employing epistemological irony against moral irony (Paul 2004). The degree to which our existence has become ironic is truly tragic, though it could be worse. Human existence has become ironic so much that one can but weep. However, there are other ways to explain the situation.

Creating the European Area of Higher Education

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Education for All and Multigrade Teaching

Multigrade teaching poses a challenge to learning. Millions of learners worldwide are taught by teachers who, at any one time, are responsible for two or more school grades/years. These are the invisible multigrade teachers who struggle to provide learning opportunities for all within curriculum and teacher education systems designed for monograded classes. In many countries multigraded classes arise out of necessity and are regarded as second class education. Yet in some parts of the world learning and teaching in multigraded settings is embraced as the pedagogy of choice, offering equivalent, and sometimes superior, learning opportunities. Multigrade teaching provides an opportunity for improved learning. This book is based on original research on challenges and opportunities in Colombia, England, Ghana, Malawi, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Peru, Turks and Caicos Islands and Vietnam. Its purpose is to raise awareness among educational policymakers and practitioners worldwide of the realities of multigrade classes in the context of Education for All, and to explore the implications for teachers, teacher educators, curriculum developers and educational planners.

Education for All and Multigrade Teaching

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