Political Science

Terrorism

Terrorism is not a new phenomenon but has been present for over two thousand years. It has been used to advance ethnic, religious, and ideological goals; it has been used by dissidents and states to maintain control; it has been used at times as a means for attaining or maintaining power for its own sake. Terrorism has often appeared as a response to the intrusion of outside groups in established societies. This book places terrorism in a historical and analytical context. It is a comparison of terrorist groups over time, noting both similarities and differences. It will also contribute to discussions of the underlying causes of terrorism by providing a broader context than is usually attempted. It is important to put recent terrorist events in an appropriate context and to learn what history has to offer for dealing with this type of political violence.

Terrorism

Terror, Terrorism, and the Human Condition

This book is an attempt to clarify the often murky connections between terrorism, terrorists, and terror. It is designed for the general educated audience interested in recent events, the history leading up to them, and the prospects for dealing with the after effects.

Terror, Terrorism, and the Human Condition

Taiwanese Identity and Democracy

This book examines the issues of democracy, nationalism and strengthening Taiwan consciousness in the light of the campaign strategies employed in Taiwan’s 2004 presidential and legislative election from the perspective of the Taiwanese people and Taiwanese culture. Particular attention is paid to the mindset of the opposition party.

Taiwanese Identity and Democracy

Sustainable Diplomacy

Drawing on a variety of disciplines, Sustainable Diplomacy is a highly constructive work. Set in the context of modern Moroccan-Spanish relations, this text is a direct critique of realism as it is practiced in modern diplomacy. Proposing a new eco-centric approach to relations between nation-states and bioregions, Wellman presents the case for Ecological Realism, an undergirding philosophy for conducting a diplomacy which values the role of popular religions, ecological histories, and the consumption and waste patterns of national populations. Sustainable Diplomacy is thus a means of building relations not only between elites but also between people on the ground, as they together face the real possibility of global ecological destruction.

Sustainable Diplomacy

Stormy Weather

In the coming presidential primaries, no state is as important in setting the stage – or affecting the odds – as New Hampshire. This small, mountainous, proudly distinctive state holds the first primary and the results, both real and in comparison to expectations, can greatly influence the competition for the highest office in the land. Candidates who do well can create momentum and gain support, while those who do worse than expected can be counted out. Scala explains the distinctiveness of New Hampshire politics and how the candidates create strategies to appeal to the state’s voters. New Hampshire’s sympathy for reformist candidates has the paradoxical affect of jumpstarting the campaigns of those candidates least representative of Democratic voters nationally. The implications for Democratic chances to win the presidency in 2004 are discussed.

Stormy Weather

States Within States

Many of the existing juridical states in the Third World remain fragile and prone to collapse. Yet, these conditions have not always given way to anarchy. In some cases, the breakdown of weak and often arbitrary states has given way to more coherent and viable, though not necessarily benevolent, political entities. This book examines the extent to which these sub-units – ‘ states within states ‘ – represent alternatives that the international community could look to in a long-term effort to bring stability, security and development to peoples in the Third World.

States Within States

State Sovereignty

State sovereignty is the foundation of international relations. This thought-provoking book explores the gap between seeing sovereignty as either absolute or relative. It argues that state sovereignty is both factual and judicial and that the ‘loss’ of sovereignty exists only at the margins of the international society. With many interesting real-world examples of ambiguous sovereignty examined, this is an important argument against those who are quick to claim that ‘sovereignty’ is under assault.

State Sovereignty

Religion, Politics and Thomas Hobbes

The essaysthat comprise thisvolume were written over the period of some ten years, for different purposes and on different occasions, but they are unitedby a number of features, which this preface may serve to indicate. While the collection begins with a translation drawn from the fourth p- sentation of Hobbes’s political thought, namely, the Latin Leviathan of 1668, after The Elements of Law (1640), De Cive (1642 and 1647) and the English Leviathan of 1651, the focus of the essays is largely on theEnglish version of his masterpiece of political philosophy. It isthe center of gravityinthe twenty eight years spanninghis departure from England for exile in France in 1640 till the publication in 1668 of the Latin Leviathan,withits lengthy and c- plex Appendix. The translation andintroduction of theAppendix, previously published,appears here with several revisions and additions, as does the essay Thomas Hobbes and the EconomicTrinity. ‘ A second feature common to these essays isthe deliberate attempttomake sense of thereligious elements inHobbes’s thought, bothintheir own rightand inrelation to his politics and natural science. These themes are woven together in complex ways. For instance, objecting to the use of Greek philosophic language and concepts to interpret the doctrines of the Christian religion, he propounds what he takes to be a more thoroughly scriptural interpretation, in pursuit of the goal of demolishing the basis for anypower inthe state independent of thecivil sovereign.

Religion, Politics and Thomas Hobbes

Government and Research

“There has been a flare-up in interest in science policy and a key factor in this is the increased interest in analysing the role that research can play in informing policy making. A pioneering venture in this field was Government and Research: The Rothschild Experiment in a Government Department (1983) Heinemann. No other work had penetrated the deepest recesses of government to observe at first hand the attempts of a major department to determine its research agenda through collaboration with leading scientists in a wide range of fields, to observe how research was commissioned, and then evaluated by scientific teams, and how it began to enter the policy blood streams of the departments. This revised and augmented version updates the original text for current policy concerns and takes account of changes in science policy studies, whilst preserving its essential themes. It contains a succinct account of where matters now stand as well as an extended analysis of the themes that continue to dominate research and science policy. “”Finally, the rest of the world has caught up with Kogan and Henkel. Twenty-five years ago their ground-breaking study of the UK’s Department of Health led them to conclude that sustained interaction between scientists and bureaucrats was the key to unleashing the value of science for the policy process. I found the first edition of this book the single most compelling and comprehensive treatment of this complex interaction. They may have felt like voices in the wilderness then; today, however, they can take their rightful place as pre-cursors and leaders of what has become a mass-movement for ‘evidence-based policy’. This re-issued and significantly updated edition, includes many recent initiatives that they and colleague Steve Hanney might rightfully claim as their offspring. The timeliness of the current edition only serves to highlight just how far ahead of their time they really were.”” Dr Jonathan Lomas, Chief Executive Officer of the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation. Bryony Soper: “”This thoughtful and thoroughly researched book was an important theoretical and practical guide for those establishing the NHS R&D Programme in the early 1990s. Some of the details of the multi-faceted relationships between science and government have necessarily changed over the years, but the complexities described in this book are still all too evident, and it remains as relevant today as it was originally.”” Bryony Soper, former Assistant Secretary in the R&D Division of the Department of Health.”

Government and Research

Hegel’s Idea of the Good Life

In Hegel’s Idea of the Good Life , Joshua D. Goldstein presents the first book-length study of the development and meaning of Hegel’s account of human flourishing. This volume will be welcomed by philosophers and political theorists seeking to engage with the details of Hegel’s early and mature social thought. By bringing Hegel’s earliest writings into dialogue with his Philosophy of Right , Goldstein argues that Hegel’s mature political philosophy should be understood as a response to his youthful failure to build a sustainable account of the good life upon the foundations of ancient virtue. This study reveals how Hegel’s mature response integrates ancient concerns for the well-ordered life and modern concerns for autonomy in a new, robust conception of selfhood that can be actualized across the full expanse of the modern political community.

Hegel’s Idea of the Good Life

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