Psychology & Psychiatry

The Matter of the Mind

The Matter of the Mind addresses and illuminates the relationship between psychology and neuroscience by focusing on the topic of reduction. Written by leading philosophers in the field Discusses recent theorizing in the mind-brain sciences and reviews and weighs the evidence in favour of reductionism against the backdrop of recent important advances within psychology and the neurosciences Collects the latest work on central topics where neuroscience is now making inroads in traditional psychological terrain, such as adaptive behaviour, reward systems, consciousness, and social cognition.

The Matter of the Mind

The Mind as a Scientific Object

What holds together the various fields, which – considered together – are supposed to constitute the general intellectual discipline that people now call cognitive science? This book argues that all cognitive sciences are not equal, and that rather only neurophysiology and cultural psychology are suited to account for the mind’s ontology.

The Mind as a Scientific Object

The Missing Link in Cognition

How do we develop self-awareness, or a sense of self? One of the most popular theories is that language plays a major role: language and the narrative form allow us to develop a sense of self because this sense is dependent upon representational thought and the psychological manipulation of representations. Some scholars argue against this theory, claiming that more than language and representational thought is needed. Comparing human and animal cognition is a particularly powerful way of examining this disagreement; if animals possess self-awareness without having the representational linguistic capabilities of humans, then the comparison will provide significant evidence for the argument that language and narrative form do not play the only role, and that researchers may have overlooked a cognitive link. This volume will be of great interest to researchers in cognitive, developmental, and ocial psychology.

The Missing Link in Cognition

Memory and Emotion

Understanding the interplay between memory and emotion is crucial for the work of researchers in many arenas–clinicians, psychologists interested in eyewitness testimony, psychobiologists, to name just a few. Memory and Emotion spans all these areas and brings them together into one volume. Daniel Reisberg and Paula Hertel have assembled contributions from the most visible and productive researchers working at the intersection of emotion and memory. The result is a sophisticated profile of our current understanding of how memory is shaped both by emotion and emotional disorder. The diverse list of topics includes the biology of traumatic memory, the memory disorders produced by depression, anxiety, and schizophrenia, the nature of emotional memory both in children and the elderly, and the collective memory processes at work in remembering the Holocaust. This unified collection of cutting-edge research will be an invaluable guide to scholars and students in many different research areas.

Memory and Emotion

Psychologists’ Desk Reference

The Psychologists’ Desk Reference, 2nd Edition is a tool for practising psychologists and graduate students alike.

Psychologists’ Desk Reference

Effective and Emerging Treatments in Pediatric Psychology

This book provides practicing clinicians with an update on treatments found to be effective in pediatric psychology. It includes details on a number of treatment techniques for different pediatric problems. In addition, its companion website contains entire treatment manuals written by leading researchers in pediatric psychology.

Effective and Emerging Treatments in Pediatric Psychology

Conceptualizing Music

This book shows how recent work in cognitive science, especially that developed by cognitive linguists and cognitive psychologists, can be used to explain how we understand music. The book focuses on three cognitive processes–categorization, cross-domain mapping, and the use of conceptual models–and explores the part these play in theories of musical organization.The first part of the book provides a detailed overview of the relevant work in cognitive science, framed around specific musical examples. The second part brings this perspective to bear on a number of issues with which music scholarship has often been occupied, including the emergence of musical syntax and its relationship to musical semiosis, the problem of musical ontology, the relationship between words and music in songs, and conceptions of musical form and musical hierarchy.The book will be of interest to music theorists, musicologists, and ethnomusicologists, as well as those with a professional or avocational interest in the application of work in cognitive science to humanistic principles.

Conceptualizing Music

Ways of Listening

“In Ways of Listening , musicologist Eric Clarke explores musical meaning, music’s critical function in human lives, and the relationship between listening and musical material. Clarke outlines an “”ecological approach”” to understanding the perception of music, arguing that the way we hear and understand music is not simply a function of our brain structure or of the musical “”codes”” given to us by culture, but must be considered within the physical and social contexts of listening.”

Ways of Listening

The Psychotherapist’s Own Psychotherapy

In this pioneering volume, distinguished clinicians explore both receiving and conducting psychotherapy with psychotherapists. It richly fills the void created by the secrecy and privacy that has shrouded the personal treatment of therapists. The book gathers together personal narratives, clinical wisdom, and new research on subjects that are of vital importance to practitioners, students, and their educators.

The Psychotherapist’s Own Psychotherapy

Modeling Rationality, Morality, and Evolution

“This collection focuses on questions that arise when morality is considered from the perspective of recent work on rational choice and evolution. Linking questions like “”Is it rational to be moral?”” to the evolution of cooperation in “”The Prisoners Dilemma,”” the book brings together new work using models from game theory, evolutionary biology, and cognitive science, as well as from philosophical analysis. Among the contributors are leading figures in these fields, including David Gauthier, Paul M. Churchland, Brian Skyrms, Ronald de Sousa, and Elliot Sober.”

Modeling Rationality, Morality, and Evolution

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